Event Details

From the Battle in France to the Liberation of Germany: Letters and Artifacts from the Harry K. Wolff Jr. Collection

Among the hundreds of thousands of US soldiers called to duty during WWII was a thirty-year-old Jewish lawyer from San Francisco named Harry K. Wolff Jr. His army unit landed in France around D-Day in June 1944 and fought its way to Germany over the next year. Postwar, Wolff acted as a judge advocate for American soldiers and witnessed war crime tribunals at the former concentration camp in Dachau, where he was one of the officers responsible for 30,000 Nazi soldiers housed while awaiting trial.

Wolff wrote letters home describing his experiences abroad—including basic training, deployment in combat, and his time at Dachau and the subsequent trials—as well as the “souvenirs” he picked up along the way. Unusual for most US soldiers who brought home memorabilia, he wrote detailed descriptions of where and when he found a particular piece, often taking pictures of the locations.

Among the artifacts he collected are foreign brochures, pamphlets, and periodicals; copies of the Stars and Stripes newspaper produced by the US military; Nazi armbands, flags, medals, weapons and, notably, fragments from a giant swastika formerly perched atop the Nazi party rally stadium in Nuremberg but blown up by his own air defense unit on orders of General Patton.

In 2016, Wolff’s daughter, Andrea Stanley, and her husband David, donated their incredible collection of hundreds of letters, photos, and artifacts to USC, where it joins a growing wealth of Holocaust and other genocide-related material, including the testimonies in the USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive; the USC Libraries’ Holocaust and Genocide Studies Collection of primary and secondary sources; and the Feuchtwanger Memorial Library, home of the archives of European exiles who fled the Third Reich and settled in California.

Free
Get tickets

Engineering Abroad - Study Abroad Week

Engineering students CAN study abroad! Join us to learn more about studying abroad as a Viterbi student.  This is a great opportunity to get your questions answered. 

This is part of Study Abroad Week, click to see what other events are going on this week.

Get tickets

Sand Mandala

USC Pacific Asia Museum is proud to host Tibetan monks from the Drepung Gomang Monastery. They will spend one week creating a Sand Mandala, a Tibetan Buddhist tradition that involves the creation and destruction of paintings made from colored sand. Once completed, it is ritualistically dismantled to symbolize the Buddhist belief in the transitory nature of material life.

The opening blessing ceremony will take place on Sunday, January 20 at 12:00pm and the closing dissolution ceremony will take place on Saturday, January 26 at 12:00pm.

Museum visitors will be able to observe the creation of the mandala during regular public open hours.

Free with museum admission
Get tickets

Trojan Farmers Market

Every Wednesday morning, as the sun begins to peek between the clouds, local farmers and vendors set up their booths filled with a vibrant array of locally grown produce and carefully crafted, handmade products in USC’s McCarthy Quad. Tasty aromas fill the air as fresh ingredients sizzle on the hot stoves.

The Trojan Farmers Market is an open-air marketplace that brings fresh, locally sourced produce and goods to the USC campus. When you purchase from the market, you incorporate sustainable practices into your daily life here at USC. Everything here is brought from the farm straight to you! The Trojan Farmers Market now accepts EBT. See the Market Manager for more information.

Get tickets

Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership (K-12/Online) Webinar Session

Join the USC Rossier Office of Admissions and Scholarships to learn more about the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership online (EDL online) program. The program will prepare you to understand and apply relevant research and theory as a leader of K-12 classrooms, schools and districts. Designed to accommodate your schedule as a working professional, this three-year program trains you to become a critically conscious leader with the skills to address inequities in education that affect learning opportunities and outcomes. Candidates for this program must have a master’s degree, a minimum of three years of relevant full-time work experience and leadership experience.

The EDL online program is only offered for the K-12 Leadership in Urban School Settings concentration.

Free

Dr, Justin Landy (Franklin & Marshall College)

Dr. Justin Landy

 

Franklin & Marshall College

Wed, January 23, 2019

Noon, 12-1:00pm

MCB 101 (Michelson Center)

Title: Morality, the Mind, and Meta-Science

MCB
Get tickets

How can we acknowledge and work to change racist structures of academia in the classroom?

 (Antiracist Pedagogy Teaching and Learning Discussion 4)

Elizabeth Galoozis, Head of Information Literacy at USC Libraries will lead the fourth in a series of Anti-Racist Teaching & Learning Community Discussions, leading a discussion on the question: How can we acknowledge and work to change racist structures of academia in the classroom?

A joint project of the Anti-Racist Pedagogy Collective and the USC Libraries, Anti-Racist Teaching & Learning Community Discussions are aimed at new and seasoned teachers of all kinds who want to make their classrooms not only safe but also just. Each discussion will be led by a member of the organizing group (see below) and be centered around one or more readings, which the discussion leader will summarize. Light lunch will be provided. Just bring an open mind and a desire to incorporate anti-racist pedagogy into whatever kind of teaching you do.

For more information and to RSVP, go to https://tinyurl.com/antiracistpedagogy. Please RSVP no later than January 20.

 

Can't join the conversation? Learn more at the Anti-Racist Pedagogy Collective's research guide: http://libguides.usc.edu/antiracistpedagogy.

This project is funded by a USC Libraries Dean’s Challenge Grant. Watch for a panel on these discussions at the Libraries’ Black History Month Symposium in February!

 

Organizing Group

Sanders Bernstein, Ph.D. student in English and Assistant Lecturer, English Department

Alyssa Brissett, Social Work Librarian, USC Libraries

Elizabeth Galoozis, Head of Information Literacy, USC Libraries

Kevin Klipfel, Instructional Design and Assessment Librarian, USC Libraries

Lacey Schauwecker, Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, Spanish and Portuguese Department

Get tickets

Innovation on Job Accessibility with General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) Data: Dr. Gary Painter, Madison Swayne

METRANS Spring 2019 Speaker Series

This presentation analyzes job access in Los Angeles County via public transportation based on a travel time, via transit, to jobs.  We use open source General Transit Feed System (GTFS) data to model the transit network and interface with a variety of computing tools including JavaScript, ArcPy for ArcGIS and statistical packages to measure the number of jobs accessible from these tracts, leveraging data to allow us to simulate job access with different transit investments. 

Gary Painter is a Professor in the Sol Price School of Public Policy at USC. He also serves as the Director of the Sol Price Center for Social Innovation. Professor Painter’s research interests focuses on social innovation, housing, urban economics, and education policy. 

Madison Swayne is a Ph.D. candidate in the Urban Planning and Development Program at the Price School of Public Policy. Madi has developed new methods for measuring transit access using online, open source data, and computer coding for automated data collection. 

METRANS is dedicated to solving metropolitan and transportation problems through research, education, and outreach. 

Lunch will be served. 

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2019 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM Ralph and Goldy Lewis Hall
RSVP: Adyl Abdykali at abdykali@usc.edu

Get tickets

Re/Writing West: Dispatches from a borderless nation

Exclusionary and violent — from the hard-handed policing tactics in Arizona to protestors screaming at asylum-seeking children, the popular image of the U.S. West is rooted in an age-old vision of confrontation. Meanwhile, ongoing national conversations about race have largely operated on a north/south black/white axis.

The current moment calls for a redrawing of frontiers.

Panelists will discuss their work in the reframing of the narrative of the U.S. West by scrutinizing evolving concepts of citizenship, white supremacy, the meaning of “minority” in “minority-majority” and who occupies the central definition of American.

In this discussion, borders refer to the well-entrenched and often inaccurate narratives about the West, the U.S. and the definition of “us.”

Panelists:

Michelle García is a New York and Texas-based journalist and essayist and a current Soros Equality Fellow and Hearst Visiting Fellow at USC's Annenberg School.  She is the 2019 recipient of the Dobie Paisano Fellowship through The University of Texas at Austin and the Texas Institute of Letters, and the Bill Lane Center for the American West media fellowship at Stanford University. She is the curator and editor of Re/Writing West: Dispatches from a Borderless Nation, to be published in Jan. 2019.  Her work has appeared in the Washington Post, New York Times, Oxford American, Guernica, The Texas Observer, Columbia Journalism Review, The Atlantic’s Quartz, Insight Crime, NACLA, the Baffler, Salon, The Nation, AlJazeera America, among other publications. García is working on a non-fiction book about borders and their powerful influence on U.S. identity, politics and culture of violence.  www.michellegarciainc.com/ @pistoleraprod

Carolina A. Miranda is a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, where she covers art, architecture, design and film for the Culture High & Low blog. Prior to this, she served as staff reporter at TIME magazine, as well as an independent journalist, contributing stories to ARTnews, Fast Company, Architect, Art in America and National Public Radio. She is a regular contributor for KCRW’s “Press Play.” Find her on Twitter at @cmonstah.

Daniel Hernandez is editor of LA Taco and a contributor to KCRW and KPCC. He is former Mexico bureau chief for VICE News, and former staff writer at the Los Angeles Times and LA Weekly. Daniel is author of the book "Down & Delirious in Mexico City.”

Sandy Tolan is a professor of journalism at the Annenberg School at USC.  He is the author of the international bestseller, The Lemon Tree, two other books, and hundreds of articles and public radio reports for more than forty outlets.  A three-time winner of the Robert F. Kennedy ward, Tolan has reported from more than 35 countries on the intersection of international migration, indigenous identity, natural resources and the global economy.

William Deverell, Director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West and of USC Libraries Collections Convergence Initiative will moderate the panel discussion.

Co-sponsored by the Annenberg School at USC and the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West. A partnership with Guernica magazine on the nexus of race, national identity and the U.S. West.

Lunch will be served. 

Free

Re/Writing West: Dispatches from a borderless nation (USC Annenberg and USC ICW)

Wednesday, January 23, 2019
12 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.  
USC Doheny Library 240 

Exclusionary and violent — from the hard-handed policing tactics in Arizona to protestors screaming at asylum-seeking children, the popular image of the U.S. West is rooted in an age-old vision of confrontation. Meanwhile, ongoing national conversations about race have largely operated on a north/south black/white axis.

The current moment calls for a redrawing of frontiers.

Panelists will discuss their work in the reframing of the narrative of the U.S. West by scrutinizing evolving concepts of citizenship, white supremacy, the meaning of “minority” in “minority-majority” and who occupies the central definition of American.

In this discussion, borders refer to the well-entrenched and often inaccurate narratives about the West, the U.S. and the definition of “us.”

Panelists:

Michelle García is a New York and Texas-based journalist and essayist and a current Soros Equality Fellow and Hearst Visiting Fellow at USC's Annenberg School.  She is the 2019 recipient of the Dobie Paisano Fellowship through The University of Texas at Austin and the Texas Institute of Letters, and the Bill Lane Center for the American West media fellowship at Stanford University. She is the curator and editor of Re/Writing West: Dispatches from a Borderless Nation, to be published in Jan. 2019.  Her work has appeared in the Washington Post, New York Times, Oxford American, Guernica, The Texas Observer, Columbia Journalism Review, The Atlantic’s Quartz, Insight Crime, NACLA, the Baffler, Salon, The Nation, AlJazeera America, among other publications. García is working on a non-fiction book about borders and their powerful influence on U.S. identity, politics and culture of violence.  www.michellegarciainc.com/ @pistoleraprod

Carolina A. Miranda is a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, where she covers art, architecture, design and film for the Culture High & Low blog. Prior to this, she served as staff reporter at TIME magazine, as well as an independent journalist, contributing stories to ARTnews, Fast Company, Architect, Art in America and National Public Radio. She is a regular contributor for KCRW’s “Press Play.” Find her on Twitter at @cmonstah.

Daniel Hernandez is editor of LA Taco and a contributor to KCRW and KPCC. He is former Mexico bureau chief for VICE News, and former staff writer at the Los Angeles Times and LA Weekly. Daniel is author of the book "Down & Delirious in Mexico City.”

Sandy Tolan is a professor of journalism at the Annenberg School at USC.  He is the author of the international bestseller, The Lemon Tree, two other books, and hundreds of articles and public radio reports for more than forty outlets.  A three-time winner of the Robert F. Kennedy ward, Tolan has reported from more than 35 countries on the intersection of international migration, indigenous identity, natural resources and the global economy.

William Deverell, Director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West and of USC Libraries Collections Convergence Initiative will moderate the panel discussion.

Co-sponsored by the Annenberg School at USC and the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West. A partnership with Guernica magazine on the nexus of race, national identity and the U.S. West.

Lunch will be served. 

Get tickets