Event Details

From the Battle in France to the Liberation of Germany: Letters and Artifacts from the Harry K. Wolff Jr. Collection

Among the hundreds of thousands of US soldiers called to duty during WWII was a thirty-year-old Jewish lawyer from San Francisco named Harry K. Wolff Jr. His army unit landed in France around D-Day in June 1944 and fought its way to Germany over the next year. Postwar, Wolff acted as a judge advocate for American soldiers and witnessed war crime tribunals at the former concentration camp in Dachau, where he was one of the officers responsible for 30,000 Nazi soldiers housed while awaiting trial.

Wolff wrote letters home describing his experiences abroad—including basic training, deployment in combat, and his time at Dachau and the subsequent trials—as well as the “souvenirs” he picked up along the way. Unusual for most US soldiers who brought home memorabilia, he wrote detailed descriptions of where and when he found a particular piece, often taking pictures of the locations.

Among the artifacts he collected are foreign brochures, pamphlets, and periodicals; copies of the Stars and Stripes newspaper produced by the US military; Nazi armbands, flags, medals, weapons and, notably, fragments from a giant swastika formerly perched atop the Nazi party rally stadium in Nuremberg but blown up by his own air defense unit on orders of General Patton.

In 2016, Wolff’s daughter, Andrea Stanley, and her husband David, donated their incredible collection of hundreds of letters, photos, and artifacts to USC, where it joins a growing wealth of Holocaust and other genocide-related material, including the testimonies in the USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive; the USC Libraries’ Holocaust and Genocide Studies Collection of primary and secondary sources; and the Feuchtwanger Memorial Library, home of the archives of European exiles who fled the Third Reich and settled in California.

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Maya Women and the Textile Tradition: Agency and Livelihood

The indigenous Maya people, who inhabit the area of Southern Mexico and northern Central America, have a distinguished, centuries-long tradition of creating vibrant textiles. Women produce most of these woven materials. The creative labor is a means of economic sustenance, of advocating for their human and civil rights often in opposition to patriarchal conventions, and of advancing their wellbeing as mothers, breadwinners, and artists.

USC alumna Marie Plakos ’70 is a photographer, sociologist, and educator with a longtime interest in documenting the work and lives of the women artists in the Mexican state of Chiapas. On view here is a selection of her photographs along with textiles and transcripts of her interviews with the artists. The transcripts create a small but essential space for the voices of Maya women to speak alongside their work. Additional items from the libraries’ collections trace some of the artistic heritage of the Maya people.

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Special Seminar: Clare Baker, University of Cambridge—"Lateral line electroreceptor development: Insights into hair cell diversification during development and evolution"

Host: Gage Crump

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Feel Better Workshops

Offered by Counseling and Mental Health Services, student can drop into these Feel Better Workshops and get support on various topics:

 12/5 - topic is Improve Your Mood

 12/6: Stress Management

 12/12 - topic is Be Resilient and Thrive

 12/13: Managing Emotions

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Let's Talk!

Offered by Counseling and Mental Health Services, students can drop in and speak to a counselor for a brief session during this time period in STU 422.

Free
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