Live! From Somewhere

Concerts everywhere have been canceled, but the show must go on.

As venues around the world go dark, we’re launching a series of performances by USC Thornton students, alumni, and faculty, live from… somewhere. Living rooms, offices, back patios, garages — wherever they may be.

Featured Video

Jazz Voice major Hazle Thunes finds a creative way to make music with her family, despite social distancing. Enjoy her performance of “What a Fool Believes” by The Doobie Brothers, accompanied by her brother.


Videos

Sang Won (David) Park
Sang Won (David) Park, a senior majoring in Keyboard Studies, performs a piece he’s preparing for his Senior Recital and grad school applications in a welcome mini-concert.
 

Daniel Weidlein
Jazz Studies alum Daniel Weidlein uses tools in his home studio, BioSoul Music, to play both piano and saxophone in a duet with himself. Enjoy his original composition, “Irma.”
 

Geovanna Nichols-Julien
Thornton alum Geovanna Nichols-Julien performs “La Vie en Rose,” a favorite with classical singers, live from her home.

 

Shea Welsh
Alum Shea Welsh, leader of USC’s Summer Guitar Seminar for 18 years, performs a version of the jazz standard, “Alone Together” from his home in Venice Beach.
 

Hazle Thunes
Jazz Voice major Hazle Thunes finds a way to make music with her family, despite social distancing. Watch Hazle perform “What a Fool Believes” by The Doobie Brothers, accompanied by her brother.
 

Alexa Rumberg
Senior Music Industry major Alexa Rumberg finds solace playing music. For Live! From Somewhere, she performs a cover of “Blossom,” by Soccer Mommy.
 

Max Opferkuch
USC Thornton student Max Opferkuch performs Bach’s Invention No. 8 in F major, accompanied by… Max Opferkuch? Enjoy a bit of digital magic with Max!
 

Nolan Juaire
Classical Guitar major Nolan Juaire works in the Ramo Hall office, where he often rehearses at night. From the office, he performs “Felicidade” by Antônio Carlos Jobim, arranged by Roland Dyens.
 

Juan-Salvador Carrasco
Thornton student Juan-Salvador Carrasco had a bit of fun with his performance of “Le Cygne,” or “The Swan,” by Camille Saint-Saëns, with the help of a rare artifact.